Site Name Tarrone (1)
Aboriginal Place Name
Language Group Koornkopanoot or Bi:gwurrung
Colony PPD
Present State/Territory VIC
Police District
Coordinates (imprecise to approx. 250m) -38.214,142.228,0
Date Between 1 Feb 1842 and 28 Feb 1842
Attack Time
Aboriginal People Killed 6
Aboriginal People Killed Notes Killed: M 6 F; Probable: M F; Possible: M2 to 3 shot at F; Wounded: M F
Non-Aboriginal People Killed 1
Non-Aboriginal People Killed Notes Killed:M 1 Robertson F; Wounded: M Robertson F
Attacker Category Settler
Attacker Details Force of 40 well-armed men on horseback led by squatter Dr Kilgour
Motive Reprisal for frightening white station workers
Type Of Motive Reprisal
Weapons Used Spears / double barrelled shot gun / muskets
Notes In retaliation a party of 40 well-armed men. One Aboriginal man captured and forced to act as a guide
Narrative According to Dr James Kilgour, licensee of Tarrone Station along with Dr William Bernar since October 1840, that in February 1842, Tarrone station was purportedly attacked by 300 Aborigines led by Purtkeun, one of five Yowen gundidj [Koornkopanoot or Bi:gwurrung speakers?] clan heads. Seven men engaged in the stockyard [in the early morning] with milking were cut off. Only one of them was armed. Two of them, Robertson and his son, tried to get back to the horses, but were prevented, the son being driven back and the father being brought down by spears. Dr Kilgour rushed out of the house in his night clothes armed with a double-barrelled shotgun, followed by Mrs and Miss Robertson with loaded muskets and ammunition. The Aborigines immediately dispersed and the men in the stockyards were rescued. With the aid of the neighbouring estates, a force of 40 well-armed men was raised and pursued the Aborigines, one of whom was captured and made to act as a guide. Just as day was breaking the encampment was found and captured, the Aborigines fleeing, two or three of them being shot as they fled. The whole property of the tribe was taken, and a quantity of warlike implements, as well as all the booty secured by the tribe in their various raids. According to Kilgour, the result was peace for nearly 12 months and no more organised attacks on the station. G.A. Robinson recorded in his diary in August 1842, that Kilgour lost his licence for reporting false information concerning the Aborigines.
Sources Clark ID 1995: 34-5 (Sources PDF)
Corroboration Rating ***